Butcher broom, and Penduline tit

Butchers broom in Lark Wood near Kineton in Gloucestershire???…

No….. well we did not find any.   OK you may wonder why, but I wanted some photos because at this time of year they are in flower. Tiny flowers but in flower and I wanted to get a photo of some. I had found a SSSI report that said they were in Lark Wood in the Cotswolds so we went there and it was muddy and cold and we walked and walked, there was a little stream and and a ford with a foot bridge and we saw a Little Egret..

 

We saw quite a lot of Laurel Spurge but no Butchers Broom.

On the way back we stopped of at Plocks Court in Gloucester to see the Penduline Tit. There was a small group of Birdo’s some with huge lenses and the guy with the longest lens and thus the main  man  showed me where the Tit was and it immediately flew  from that point to somewhere else and I saw a flash of small bird and so I said OK I have spotted it and Mr Man said yes and that brings my bird count for the year to 163.    One Hundred and Sixty three!!!!  and I have seen about 30 so far… That is why he was Mr Man and had a huge …… lens.

I hung  about after every one else had left and saw a small bird flitting about….. several times and each time it was not a Penduline Tit. It was a Stonechat.

If you are wondering why I wanted a photo of Butchers Broom in the first place, the reason is another blog about.

   Woodland Wildflowers.

Do click the link and have a look, also if anyone knows where I can see some  Butchers Broom in the Gloucestershire/Monmouthshire area please let me know. I am also looking for some Stinking Hellebore.

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Cladonia pyxidata

These are growing on the wall at the end of my garden. The lichens are a species of Cladonia, probably pyxidata but I am not sure and there is also some moss.

The whole scene is about 5cm across…. a little world of its own.

Taken with the aid of a flash unit and then 4 photos stacked together.

Aside

Attenborough says count butterflies; so this is how it is on Clearwell Meend.

I was motivated to spend an hour or so photographing the butterflies on Clearwell Meed today because we have recently had some Marbled Whites in the garden. As I had expected there were lots flitting about up there, possibly they were just about out numbered by the Meadow Browns, but they of course look more spectacular.

There were quite a few skippers about, I think both Small and Essex skippers. They are very difficult to tell apart, it all come down to the tip of their antennae and  the Essex has a distinctly black tip, as does the one below.

The Small skipper does not have a noticeably black tip…  Could this be him?

I also saw a Peacock, a Red Admiral and several Gatekeepers.

 

 

 

 

There were also lots of day flying moths, including Silver Y and Six spotted Burnetts.

And now a day later David Attenborough has urged us all to go out and count Butterflies, so who is ahead of the game…. Big butterfly count