Sanlucar waders

There are some rocky areas a little walk along from where we are staying and at low tide they are exposed and a small selection of waders turn up.  So today I sat on one of the rocks for  a couple of hours and photographed what decided I was not too great a  threat and thus approached a bit closer.

First was a Bar-tailed Godwit, probing in the sand for a juicy worm. You can see the bars on it tail.

The commonest birds there are Turnstones and I did get a shot of one turning a stone.

Second commonest are Sanderlings, delightful little birds, always on the move.

There were some Plovers, mostly Kentish but also some Little Ringed Plovers.

I also saw in the distance, Little Egret, Cormorant, Yellow Legged Gull, Dunlin and probably a Whimbrel but it might have been a Curlew. .

And this is the local beach, the rocky bit is behind me…. Not many people about, just the occasional dog walker or couple taking a stroll.  No sunbathers this year!

 

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Sanlucar de Barrameda birds

Poor weather this year in Andalucia so I have been taking a few bird photos locally near our flat, even from the terrace.  There are potentially several different Hirudines in this area at this time. There are some that even pop over from N Africa, though with the weather the way it is I can’t think why.

I snapped away and got lots of blanks but did get a few which have allowed me to identify this one as a Crag Martin…. the clincher is the ‘windows’ in the tail feathers which only show when it spreads its tail. They are not gaps but white coloured feathers.

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There is a bit of a scrubby area down from our flat and it holds some good birds. I saw a Hoopoe and always hear Cetti’s Warbler, there are lots of Chiffchafs and this Fan tailed warbler also called a Zitting Cisticola.

 

On the beach there are a small mix of birds, there are Sanderlings and Turnstones, along the strand line, Lesser Black backed and Yellow legged gulls a bit further back in and then some Egrets, both the Cattle ones with yellow bills and the Little Egret.

Plenty of Sparrows about, House Sparrows, not Spanish though I did see some Spanish Sparrows a few days ago at a lagoon about 20 Kilometers inland.

Sancti Petri wall paintings

In my last post I published some wall paintings of shells from the village of Sancti Petri. I then looked back at them and they all looked quite dark. I think that they look much darker on the blog site/FB than they do on my lap top.

Stramonita haemastoma, common name the red-mouthed rock shell or the Florida dog winkle,

So I have lightened them and am now republishing them because I think they deserve to be presented at their best.

Tonna galea, commonly known as the giant tun, is a species of marine gastropod mollusc.

Helix pomatia, common names the Roman snail, Burgundy snail, edible snail or escargot.

 

I like the texture of the surrounding wall, it helps to set them off.

Aporrhais pespelecani, common name the “pelican’s foot is a species of sea snail.

There are just five of them.

Osilinus lineatus  Lined/Thick Top Shell;

Not able to find any reference to Bolina rugosa, although it looks like a Painted top shell to me.

Here is the final one.

 

Looks like a Murex shell to me but again can not find any reference to Bolinus Grand or Dolinus Grand.

Ham Wall

Had an away day yesterday (5th Sept 2018) and went to Ham Wall R.S.P.B reserve.  Some nice birds on view, I just walked round with one camera with telephoto attached so shots of the scenery and the starlings in the evening were a bit restricted. However I did manage a few nice shots.

First of all the scenic shots including one that looks very Constable to me.

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There was a Great White Egret, in fact there were several but this one was a poser and I took lots of shots as did every one else…here are a few of them

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And of course there was other stuff…. I did see a Bittern, well only just. It flapped up out of a reed bed and I just caught about 3 wing beats before it disappeared but it was enough for a tick… There were Marsh Harriers about and I think I saw a Peregrine, I heard Water Rail but did not see them and the Little Grebes were very obliging.

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Finally there were the Starlings… murmurating but not in the numbers that you get in the late Autumn and Winter.

 

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Honey Bee

105 mm Sigma macro with 36 mm extension tube. I was trying to get some of them in flight but unless they are in exactly the right spot then they are out of focus. I will take another 500 shots to hopefully get one which is as neat as this one when it was not on the move.